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1Dec
2017
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World Aids Day

December 1, 2017

World AIDS Day takes place on the 1st December each year. It’s an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, to show support for people living with HIV, and to commemorate those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. Founded in 1988, World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day

2017 Theme: My health, my right

Fact sheet – Latest statistics on the status of the AIDS epidemic

People living with HIV

• In 2016, there were 36.7 million [30.8 million–42.9 million] people living with HIV.
• 34.5 million [28.8 million–40.2 million] adults
• 17.8 million [15.4 million–20.3 million] women (15+ years)
• 2.1 million [1.7 million–2.6 million] children (<15 years)

New HIV infections

• Worldwide, 1.8 million [1.6 million–2.1 million] people became newly infected with HIV in 2016.
• Since 2010, new HIV infections among adults declined by an estimated 11%, from 1.9 million [1.6 million–2.1million] to 1.7 million [1.4 million–1.9 million] in 2016.
• New HIV infections among children declined by 47% since 2010, from 300 000 [230 000–370 000] in 2010 to 160 000 [100 000–220 000] in 2016

AIDS-related deaths

• AIDS-related deaths have fallen by 48% since the peak in 2005.
• In 2016, 1 million [830 000–1.2 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses worldwide, compared to 1.9 million [1.7 million–2.2 million] in 2005 and 1.5 million [1.3 million–1.7 million] in 2010.

People living with HIV accessing antiretroviral therapy

• As of June 2017, 20.9 million [18.4 million–21.7 million] people living with HIV were accessing antiretroviral therapy, up from 17.1 million [15.1 million–17.8 million] in 2015 and 7.7 million [6.8 million–8.0 million] in 2010.
• In 2016, around 53% [39–65%] of all people living with HIV had access to treatment.
• Some 54% [40–65%] of adults aged 15 years and older living with HIV had access to treatment, but just 43% [30–54%] of children aged 0–14 years had access.
• In 2016, around 76% [60–88%] of pregnant women living with HIV had access to antiretroviral medicines to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies.

 

Source: www.unaids.org
Image Credit: www. naca.gov.ng

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